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or not the troops deal with the taliban. how do you, you've seen this. how does that work out? how do you weigh both things? >> well this is the first time we've come out of a war, jenna, without really coming out of a war. the american presence will be in afghanistan probably for another four to five years. and beginning in 2014 the forces there will be down to something like 32,000 to your point. they have already been taken out of the budget. that will leave our presence there to do only two things, counter terrorism, killing the taliban and a little bit of advise and assist to the afghan army. many inside the pentagon say that is not nearly enough right now particularly given all the other uncertainties in the world in places like iran and north korea. the risk is that these nations will miscalculate, they will make mistakes. they will misinterpret what the america's all about when they see the pentagon going after its budget with a meat axe, jenna. jenna: quick question on this because i can't imagine what it is like to be in war right now which we are and hearing about the defense cuts at home
organization. it belongs to no state. attacking states, laying low state government, defeating the taliban, al qaeda, making war in it will not stop it because terrorism like steanlt like markets are independenter in their character. what we have created beginning of the 21st century is a deep symmetry between the challenges we face and the political response the political institutions we have to respond to that. every challenge is interdependent global cross frontier and the primary political actors that respond are bounded, frontiered, independent nation states. and in that a symmetry, you can see the dysfunction of the modern world. we watch, for example, starting four or five years ago in copenhagen and going through mexico city and due by and recent meetings where 180 or 190 nations came together to renew the protocol already out of date in term of the ecological challenges but to embrace that now and failing to do so. and going home and saying that is because our sovereignty said china, the u.s., now canada, even leaders doesn't permit us to monitor. doesn't permit us to report to intern
and what it means for our troops in the fight against the taliban. >>> plus, some breaking news from sin city. police naming a prime suspect in a wild shootout that left of three people dead on the las vegas strip. now they need your help tracking him downment -- down. exciting and would always come to my rescue. but as time passed, i started to notice max just wasn't himself. and i knew he'd feel better if he lost a little weight. so i switched to purina cat chow healthy weight formula. i just fed the recommended amount... and they both loved the taste. after a few months max's "special powers" returned... and i got my hero back. purina cat chow healthy weight. after a few months max's "special powers" returned... and i'm here to tell homeowners that are 62 and older about a great way to live a better retirement. it's called a reverse mortgage. [ male announcer ] call right now to receive your free dvd and booklet with no obligation. it answers questions like how a reverse mortgage works, how much you qualify for, the ways to receive your money, and more. plus, when you call now, you'll
hailed as a hero for standing up to the taliban and now the girl who was brutally attacked has been nominated for the nobel peace prize. the 15-year-old girl was attacked by gunmen, traveling home from school in october. the teenager was targeted for writing a blog that criticized the taliban for keeping girls from getting an education. more good news from the girl. the doctor successfully carried out a five-hour surgery on london to reconstruct her skull and help restore her lost hearing. for more than sick years, a portrait of jesus has hung in middle school, along with other well-known and important people in history. but that may be ending. the freedom from religion and the aclu says it violates the first amendment and wants to take it down. hiram, what have you been able to tell the school about the demand that the portrait of jesus has to go? >> well, we have been asked by the school district to do a report and recommendation. one of the things that we found out is that, you know, this is the back bone of america, jackson, ohio. these are hard-working fireworks and they have b
hearing. taliban gunmen tried to assassinate 15-year-old malala in october because she had spoken out in favor of girls education. she is recovering in a british hospital. >>> tourists outside london's buckingham palace got a real surprise today. a man broke through a security cordon and held a large knife to his own neck. in second, police moved in, and that set off a brief confrontation. the man started waving the knife, running at one of the officers, the officer used a taser. the man dropped to the ground and was handcuffed and taken to a police station. >>> this time singer chris brown apparently won't face any civil or criminal charges. fellow singer frank ocean says brown jumped him leading to a brawl over a parking space a week ago at an l.a. recording studio. but ocean says he is dropping the matter. brown is already on five years' probation after assaulting his pop star girlfriend rihanna back in 2009. >>> the man who invented etch a sketch has passed away. french electrician andre cassagnes dreamed up the drawing toy in his garage back in 1950. etch a sketch's popularity go
are obsessed with the taliban and we ought to be but what about the gangs that are ruining neighborhoods? we need a federal task force if it takes 500 agents, if it takes 1,000 agents, go into chicago. i know holder doesn't want to do it, i gnome rahm -- i know rahm emanuel doesn't want to. he said they are guppies and cannot be concerned with drug dealers with drugs. every gang member on the street of chicago starting tomorrow morning, pick them up, we have federal law to get them off the street and put them in prison and that would cut crime and we are thought doing that. >>chris: that is a legitimate people and would not have saved the people in colorado or newtown, or in oregon. now, the questions of rights the big victory for the n.r.a. the court affirmed the 2nd amendment, but here is justice scalia writing in the majority opinion. the second amendment conferred a right to keep and bear arms but it was not unlimited. scalia talks in the majority decision about what kinds of weapons people can buy, who can buy them, where they can be carried. the right is not unlimited, sir. >>guest: we
, the taliban and associated forces in response to the 9/11 attacks and we may also use force consistent with our inherent right of national self-defense. there is nothing in international law that bans the use of remotely pilotted aircraft for this purpose or that prohibits us from using lethal force against our enemies outside of an active battlefield at least when the country involved con cents or is unwilling to take action against a threat. second, targeted strikes are ethical. without question, the ability to target a specific individual from hundreds or thousands of miles away raises profound questions. here, i think it is useful to consider such strikes against the basic principle of the law of war that govern the use of force. targeted strikes conform to the principle of necessity. requirement that the target has definite military value. in this armed conflict, individuals who are part of al qaeda or its associated forces are legitimate military targets. we have the authority to target them with lethal force, just as we target enemy leaders in past conflicts such as them and the
. it was deliberate because the plan was overthrow saddam and get out. just like we overthrew the taliban in afghanistan and then got out of there and of course afghanistan fell apart. i and iraq is falling apart very quickly. we are facing an insurgency we don't know what to do with like all the officers who are there have not been trained to fight this sort of war. it was not in the manuals and they didn't know what to do so they do what they usually do which was to bang down doors and arrest people. anyone who has read kahlÚa would have known as counterproductive because you end up killing the wrong people and you inflame -- you make them mad so the insurgents is flaming and meanwhile petraeus in mosul decides to put into effect the ideas in these books he has been reading. he and his guys start setting up an election for the new district. they vet the candidates candidatecandidate s and they said that the elections. they bring in fuel trucks. they reopened the university. they get communication systems going. they get some iraqis to open up newspapers. he opens up the border to syria
and that check is there. if congress does not want to wage war against the taliban, against whomever, they can cut off funding. >> thank you. >> i am a student at rutgers university. john mentioned the large majority of americans support giving the president the authority to kill american citizens without charges or trial or to process. my question is, if you were identified as a threat by some nameless official in the administration, where you want to process? >> the issue is not -- [applause] john: i don't think there would name him. they might name me. >> the issue is whether we are in a war situation, whether we are operating under the war powers of the constitution or whether we are in a law enforcement situation. the to have radically different approaches. we killed tens of thousands of american citizens, maybe hundreds of thousands with no due process in the civil war, and it was the right thing to do. [applause] john: on that note we're out of time. >> you want to discredit a movement, defend the confederacy. go ahead. john: ambassador bolton. no more time left. than
report. calling on hollywood to help save the doctor who used his medical practice in taliban to help the cia to track down osama bin laden. >> in the u.s., he's a hero for helping too lead our navy seals to the world's most wanted terrorist, but in pakistan, he's behind bars and considered or. who now wants to use the oscoor too bring attention to the plight of dr. afridi. >> a dramatic smash and grab. in the search to find the before they strike again. >> and the famous image capturing an iconic moment 60 years ago. raidsing the american plaghiro shima in the world war ii's most intense fighting. every day americans are caught in the middle of the budget. sweeping across the board cuts will begin in less than a reach. we heard dire warnings coming from lawmakerings, sequestitration would force longer lines and deep cuts to our military. in reality, the 85 billion in cuts makes up 2.4 percent of the federal budget and prompting republicans to use the white house to using scare tacticings. today lindsay addressing those in an interview on fox on huckabee tonight. here's the bit. >> th
weeks. the scene is a gateway for the taliban to target kabul. >>> president raul castro announced he will step down as president in 2018. the announcement came after the 81-year-old accepted a new five- year term as president. castro tapped his top lieutenant as first in line for succession. castro also says he hopes to establish two-term limits and age caps for political officers. his brother, former president fidel castro, received a standing ovation today during the meeting. >>> in vietnam, at least ten people were killed after two explosions flattened a movie special effects warehouse and three nearby homes. a pyrotechnician was preparing fire and smoke effects for a local movie when the blast happened. rescue crews say they don't know if there are other victims under the rubble. >>> and in taiwan, a celebration of lanterns to mark the new year holiday. some were traditional, such as the snake figures, to mark the year of the snake, but there are also aliens and pandas and even an angry bird. hundreds of small lanterns are released into the sky. it's beautiful. people write their
.s.-led military coalition in afghanistan admitting it incorrectly reported a 70% drop in taliban attack last year, officials admit there of no change in attacks. a coalition spokesman blames it on a clerical error. and insists it does not alter their basic,sesment of the war but it does under cut obama administration's argument. >> new york today marking 20 anniversary of first terrorist attack on world trade center in 1993. a moment of silence was held. the ceremony was held at 9/11 memorial where the trin towers were destroyed 8 years later. lori: the war on terror taking on a new front, a shocking report said that america's enemies are increasingly homegrown. >> reporter: 20 years since first world trade center attack, this investigative report shows the face of domestic terrorism is changing. the new generation of al qaeda operative is made in the u.s. >> future attacks will be less well organized, less complexed, less likely to succeed and more than likely to be conducted by citizens or long-term residents of the u.s. >> reporter: head investigated 171 individuals convicted of al qaeda relat
and killed a police officer there protecting the workers. the taliban commander by way of background banned the vaccinations. says at least ten health care workers have been killed since december. pakistan, one of just three countries where polio remains a threat. >>> and kazakhstan, talks are under way about iran's nuclear program. there are representative there's from iran, germany, and the five permanent members of the united nations security council. the u.s., france, britain, russia, china. since last round of talks last june, iran's uranium enrichment program has expanded violating u.n. resolutions. >> iran's claiming its program is for civilian use only, energy and such things but western leaders fear iran is building a nuclear bomb. >>> canada, a group of scientists is now calling for food to be dna tested to make sure these things, products, are what they say they really are. >> now paula newton will report test willing keep horse meat from ending up in beef products and other types of food fraud. >> reporter: with all of the new food scares i bet you're wondering if there's any wa
a reality. the dead included 10 civilians when rockets struck their nearby home. the pakistan taliban claimed responsibility for the attack, calling it revenge for a recent u.s. drone strike. the violence comes after a monthly record for u.s. drone strikes inside pakistan in more than a year. at least 33 people were killed in iraq on sunday when suicide attackers bombay police station. france continues to fight in mali. french forces have launched a number of aerial attacks in a bid to secure control of the rubber -- rebel holdout of kidal. a top commander was arrested earlier today near the border with algeria. amnesty to national is calling for an independent probe of civilian deaths in mali. dai thanh mou to describe an event were civilians were killed without warning. >> we asked if there were any warnings to the civilians who were there. they told us there had been no warnings at all. we sent a letter to the defense minister and asked him to launch an independent, impartial inquiry regarding the deaths of those four people. >> and the state is also seeking out a probe of other in
are more and more effective in powering afghan communities to defend against taliban intimidation and violence. plans are being developed to increase the authorized size of the alp program from 30,000 to 45,000. the next centcom commander will also play an important role in shaping our enduring partnership with afghanistan after 2014. the partnership that i fully support. ike m. concerned however by the plants to reduce the afghan national security forces by a third starting in 2015. 352,000 to 230,000 by 2017. i believe that any future reductions in the size of the afghan forces should be based on security conditions in afghanistan at that time and this afghan security forces make and providing for their country security, we should reassure them that we will continue to support these efforts by deciding that as we withdraw our forces that there won't get drawdown and afghan forces. progress in afghanistan remains fragile and significant challenges to afghanistan's long-term stability remain. among the greatest threat to its stability are the safe havens for afghan insurgents acro
. we went because it met our goal to give it about qaeda. we have been in the taliban government and set the country sorted into free play, we develop some kind of moral responsibility for helping them get it right. third, geostrategic plates in america in the world's interest to have a stable region. if afghanistan were unstable, acting pakistan's stability would be very tenuous and it challenges anyway, but i think it's important. my view is that we need to do is be persistent and consistent in the region. the reason people are so nervous is because in 2004 the inc. were going to leave and they seemed asleep before. in 1989 returned from the region. it doesn't matter whether each afghan style that appeared its become a commonly accepted truth that we left in 1989 and they're starting to think we're going to walk in 2014 and there will be nobody they can rely on. they'll have other strategic allies. so what they looking for is the idea of a long-term strategic partnership. i don't think that the specific number of troops. i think it's the idea you got an ally somewhere in their
out of her hands. but in pakistan the government is still providing shelter for the taliban. and there's still no real solid ra approachment between us and then. so it is very hard to see that her soothing, her repairing of applianc appliance-- alliances necessarily resulted in concrete policy achievements. >> suarez: susan, wasn't it a pretty complicated mess, not only where places as trudy knows, like pakistan, but even with some of america's closest allies. >> well, that's exactly right. i mean these are times where, you know, you play the hand you are dealt as secretary of state not only because the white house decides the big picture policy. but the world over the last four years has been a complicated place who would have expected that actually europe our closee-- closest allies would have been in a period of enormous internal turmoil greater than anything they have seen since the end of world war 2. so clinton was left to manage those relationships. i think i would say that she was often a soother, but often as not she was also someone who would speak out in a tough manner. look
not for afghans. they didn't invite in 2001. it meant our goal to get rid of al qaeda. when we upped the taliban government and set the country in to free play, i think we developed a responsibility for helping them set it right. third, i think in america and the world's interest to have a stability region. if afghanistan were to be completely unstable, i think pakistan's stability would be very tenuous. and they have challenges anyway. i think it's important. so my view what we need to do is be consistent and persistent in the region. the reason people in afghanistan are nervous because in 2004, they think we're going leave and they have seen us leave before. in 1989 we turned from the region. it doesn't matter which each individual afghan saw that. it's become commonly accepted truth we left in 19 the 9 ab and they're walk in 2014. and they'll be nobody they can rely on. they don't have other strategic allies. what they're looking for, in my view, the idea of a long-term strategic partnership. i don't think that's a specific number of troops in a specific amount of money. ink it's the idea you
% of their population now under afghan control and security. we've been able to diminish the taliban's capabilities. violence has gone down. we're also developing an afghan army that is increased its operational skill to provide security. so we're on the right path towards trying to give afghanistan the opportunity to govern and secure itself. >> general dempsey, very quickly, women in combat. implementing that. is there some movement on capitol hill to pass a law to make sure you don't change standards, somehow lower standards. do you think that's good legislation? >> they can legislate if they like. they don't have to do that, because -- >> you're not going to change your stance? >> we're going to make sure we have the right standards for right job to maintain the readiness of the force. my primary responsibility is the readiness of the force. there's also requirement as we open up occupational specialties to report to congress, and they would have the opportunity to ask us what we've done to standards. look, this really is about changing the paradigm from one of exclusiveness to inclusiveness to
with guns and gangs with guns, the people doing the killing. we are all obsessed with the taliban and we ought to be. what about the gangs that are ruining neighborhoods all over the country? we need a federal ta task forc, if it takes 500 agents, a thousand agents. go into chicago. i know eric holder doesn't want to do it. he says it as cookie cutter approach. rahm emanuel sent people up on the hill when the clinton administration was there saying they are giuseppeys and they can't be concerned with drug dealers with guns. every gang member on the street of chicago starting tomorrow morning. pick them up. we have a federal law to get them off the street and put them in prison and that would cut crime and we are not doing it. >> chris: it wouldn't have saved the people in newtown or in aurora, colorado. wouldn't have saved the people in clackamas county, oregon. i want to talk about the question of rights. the heller case is the big victory for the nra in which the court affirmed the second amendment means what it saids. here s what justice scalia wrote in the majority opinion. the secon
are obsessed with the taliban and we ought to be. what about the gangs? they are ruining neighborhoods all over the country? we need a federal task force, if it takes 500 agents, a thousand agents, go into chicago. i know, eric holder doesn't want to it. a cookie cutter approach and rahm eman nell doesn't want to do it. and he says they cannot be concerned with drug dealers with guns and every gang member on the street of chicago, starting tomorrow morning, let's pick 'em up, we have a federal law to get 'em off the street and put 'em in prison and that would cut crime and we're not doing it. >> chris: well, that is a perfectly legitimate point and, it wouldn't have saved the people in newtown or aurora, colorado or clackmas county, oregon. i want to talk about the question of rights. this heller case is the case, a victory for the nra in which the court affirmed, the second amendment, means what it says, but here's what justice salia wrote in the majority opinion: the second amendment conferred an individual right to keep and bear arms. of course, the right was not unlimited. not unlimited. sc
enough after the united states leaves toith stan the talin and the taliban is able to gain somewhat approaching the power they had previously when they had power, that they would welcome al-qaeda back. >> well, you know, one of the big questions that has not been answered by the president's advisors is what's the american military presence going to be after 2014. in the state of the union, he said we'll be down basically by half a year from now. there are 66,000 now. at the end of the february next year it will be 32,000. but what happens after 2014 when the so-called war is over and there are a whole number of options on the table, anywhere i'd say from 3,000 troops to 10,000 troops or 9,000 troops. and also the capabilities that could be kept in the country from the u.s. side counterterrorism error and all that. so i think what military posture the u.s. agrees to keep in after 2014, and that will effect what nato agrees to do, are the non-u.s. part of nato i think will have a big effect what happens in afghanistan in terms of this question. we should be able to preclude that if th
, and as margaret follows there's a lot of diplomacy going on in secret now to see if you can bring the taliban into real peace negotiations so that we would leave with something like a settlement. we could say "here look, we're leaving but there's an agreement among these factions." >> schieffer: and you just had the president of afghanistan karzai saying he's going to forbid any more american airstrikes. he won't allow his own people to call in airstrikes because a recent one took some civilian lives. >> reporter: concern about hitting civilian areas. that's right. i think one of the other offshoots of this drop-down will be a continued presence in some form is where those asset goes. and the theory keeps getting floated what leaves afghanistan may go to the benefit of forces in within africa because of this new threat that has come to the fore and really been highlighted in terms of aqim, their presence in libya and algeria as we saw with the hostage crisis that just happened. but what that means is it's certainly not boots on the ground. it's just assets -- >> schieffer: the president didn'
against the taliban, against whomever, they can cut off funding. >> thank you. >> i am a student at rutgers university. john mentioned the large majority of americans support giving the president the authority to kill american citizens without charges or trial or to process. my question is, if you were identified as a threat by some nameless official in the administration, where you want to process? >> the issue is not -- [applause] john: i don't think there would name him. they might name me. >> the issue is whether we are in a war situation, whether we are operating under the war powers of the constitution or whether we are in a law enforcement situation. the to have radically different approaches. we killed tens of thousands of american citizens, maybe hundreds of thousands with no due process in the civil war, and it was the right thing to do. [applause] john: on that note we're out of time. >> you want to discredit a movement, defend the confederacy. go ahead. john: ambassador bolton. no more time left. thank you for joining us and taking these difficult questions. students,
the government is still providing shelter for the taliban. and there's still no real solid ra approachment between us and then. so it is very hard to see that her soothing her repairing of appliance appliance-- alliances necessarily resulted in concrete policy achievements. >> suarez: susan wasn't it a pretty complicated mess not only where places as trudy knows like pakistan but even with some of america's closest allies. >> well, that's exactly right. i mean these are times where you know, you play the hand you are dealt as secretary of state not only because the white house decides the big picture policy. but the world over the last four years has been a complicated place who would have expected that actually europe our closee-- closest allies would have been in a period of enormous internal turmoil greater than anything they have seen since the end of world war 2. so clinton was left to manage those relationships. i think i would say that she was often a soother but often as not she was also someone who would speak out in a tough manner. look at her championship with the russians. even
these assault weapons out of their hands. >> if you have enough assault weapons to blow up the taliban, there is no need. we want to hear your phone calls on guns and immigration and hagel. give us a call. don't go anywhere because i am not. i am stuck here for the next two hours. so should you. stay with us on the bill press show. we will be back after this break. >> on your radio and on current tv this is "the bill press show." converstion started next. >> i'm a slutty bob hope. >> you are. >> the troops love me. the sweatshirt is nice and all but i could use a golden lasso. (vo) only on current tv. but when joint pain and stiffness from psoriatic arthritis hit even the smallest things became difficult. i finally understood what serious joint pain is like. i talked to my rheumatologist and he prescribed enbrel. enbrel can help relieve pain, stiffness, and stop joint damage. because enbrel, etanercept suppresses your immune system, it may lower your ability to fight infections. serious, sometimes fatal events including infections tuberculosis lymphoma, other c
of the president. i support him. we cannot change the equation at this point in time. the taliban have been determined to relentlessly attacked the afghan government. we have to not pull out and make sure we focus on a counterterrorism strategy compared to the surge strategy, which did not accomplish its goal. host: another word that was not mentioned was the use of drones in the confirmation hearing. guest: this is a controversial subject. i fall on the side of supporting our drone program relentlessly sorting our drone program to protect our troops and to prevent the united states from being harmed by terrorists. when al qaeda operatives were taken out by drones >>> in afghanistan and yemen -- by drone strikes in afghanistan and elsewhere, i commended the president for his counterterrorism policy. it has protected the homeland as best as any weapon we could have. it has been an effective way of putting al qaeda on the defense and keeping them on the run. the president deserves congratulations for being relentlessly consistent and persistent in his drone program. does that mean it has been
at the bottom of three steep mountains woke up to an overwhelming attack by the taliban, very smart attack, up to 400 taliban fighters and it seemed impossible and i asked clint rome romechier on monday who is going to be award the the medal of honor, what it was like to face these impossible odds. throughout all of this, did you ever think this is it? i'm not going to get out of here. >> it's like a fighter going into the boxing ring, you know, if you think you're going to lose before you even step into the ring, you've already lost. you're there to win, you're there to fight, you're there to, you know, your brothers to your left and right are depending on you so you don't have that in you. >> when you talk about an overwhelming force describe to me what overwhelming is. >> it's the kind of thing where every time they opened a door to run out to deliver ammunition, a sniper would pick one of them off. there were five guys trapped in a humvee for hours, three men trapped in the mortar pit for hours. the first guy killed was running to a machine gun in the corner of the camp to return fire, kil
ultimately were teaming with taliban fighters, so we talked about that in a special that will air at 10:00 tonight. >>> combat outpost keating was built in 006 with so many troops and assets deployed to iraq, those in afghanistan had to make do. one part of the strategy was to build small outposts as the u.s. pushed into eastern afghanistan. the location was a trap evident from the moment the uniate rrived in may 2009. what was your first reaction? >> first reaction was i think the same as everybody that stepped foot on that, this is a pretty indefensible spot. >> i thought we were supposed to be on top of a mountain. this is crazy. i mean, that's how i felt, you know. shooting up? but you just, i was there, you know, i can't be like this is stupid. >> reporter: this say part of the called the hindu kush mountain range you're either on or in a valley. in order to be near the local population and near the road combat outpost keating was put at the bottom of three steep mountains. ♪ soldiers had been fatally attacked there before. in 2007, private chris pfeiffer, in 2008, camp commander
. it was to liberate because the plan was overthrow saddam, get out of there, just like we overthrew the taliban in afghanistan and god as they are and of course afghanistan fell apart and we had to go through that. we are facing an insurgency. we don't know what to do. all the officers there hadn't been trained to fight this sort of war. the listening manuals. they did what they usually do, banged on doors and arrest and kill people and anyone who had read kahlÚa or naco what now is counterproductive because you end up killing the wrong people. he off their cousins and brothers who may become insurgents, too. so petraeus in mozilla decides to put into effect the ideas he's learned. so he and his guys, they start setting up an election for the new district council. they said at the elections. they bring in field trip from turkey. they get communications systems going. they get iraqis to open up newspapers. he opens at the border to syria along northern iraq. he does all this on his own. he's not touring with coronation of anybody, washington or baghdad or any place that works for a while and th
by the taliban. how is hou she is doing following a pair of complicated surgeries. >> chasing at the american dream. are today's teenagers less optimistic than their parents? the answer may surprise you. >> and new details around a deadly terror attack in benghazi. what leon panetta is revealing before leaving his post for good. >> if we are invited we'll have the opportunity to testify. we look forward to it. ♪ you know my heart burns for you... ♪ i'm up next, but now i'm sging the heartburn blues. hold on, prilosec isn't for fast relief. cue up alka-seltzer. it stops heartburn fast. ♪ oh what a relief it is! cue up alka-seltzer. it stops heartburn fast. i have obligations. cute tobligations, but obligations.g. i need to rethink the core of my portfolio. what i really need is sleep. introducing the ishares core, building blocks for the heart of your portfolio. find out why 9 out of 10 large professional investors choose ishares for their etfs. ishares by blackrock. call 1-800-ishares for a prospectus which includes investment objectives, risks, charges and expenses. read and consider i
the medicine 2001. we met our goal to get rid of al qaeda. we have under the taliban government and set the country started into screenplay, we developed some more responsibility for helping him set a rate third, i think it's an america in the center a stable region. if afghanistan were completely unstable, who'd be very tenuous but it's important. we need to be consistent and persistent in the region. the reason people in afghanistan are so nervous is because in 2004 they think we're going to leave and 18 asleep before. in 1889, we turn from the region. it doesn't matter whether each individual afghans saw that, it's become commonly accepted truth they don't have other strategic allies. so what they're looking for in my view is the idea of a long-term strategic partnership. but i think that's a specific number of troops, even a specific amount of money. their fear is they are very far away. i was asking him this question. i said what you want in the future years quite homage to see what here? said a word about business and i'll be here taking money. because if you're making money here
in afghanistan against all odds during a taliban attack. he says u.s. a high honor and a heavy burden. >> i stand here with mixed emotions of both joy and sadness. the joy comes from recognition for us doing our jobs as soldiers on distant battlefields. but it's countered by the constant reminder of the loss of our battle buddies. >> somber man. a somber and serious ceremony. but romesha's just adorable son stole the show with his antics. playing hide and seek with the press. >>> dogs for days, primped pooches strutting to win over judges at the westminster dog show in new york. best in show will be crowned tonight. judges picked winners in four categories, best of sporting, working, and terrier groups coming up today. terriers hope to continue their unfounded dominance at the dog show. >> it's so great. i have never gone in person. >> i have. a lot of times. one of the stories they make you cover again and again and again. >>> ahead this morning, we'll continue to talk about north korea, they say their overnight nuclear test in response to u.s. hostility and that stronger actions could be on the
afghan communities to defend against taliban intimidation and violence. plans are being developed to increase the authorized size of the program from 30,000 down to 45,000. the next commander will also play an important role in shaping our partnership with afghanistan after 2014. a partnership that i fully support. i am concerned however by plans to reduce the afghan national security forces by a third starting in 2015. of retreated 52,000 to two injured 30,000 by 2017. i believe any future reductions in the size of the afghan forces should be based on security conditions in afghanistan at that time and as afghan security forces' progress in providing for their country's security, we should reassure them that we will continue to support these efforts by citing as we withdraw our forces that there won't be a drawdown in afghanistan forces. progress in afghanistan remains fragile, significant challenges to afghanistan's long-term stability remains. among the greatest threat to the stability is the safe havens for the afghan insurgents across the pakistan border which the government
three kids. in october everything change would. a predawn ambush in the pakistan border. 300 taliban stormed the base where 50 american soldiers became sitting ducks in a valley surrounded by mountains owned by the income. >> what happened next is one of the most intense battles of the entire war in stanford. the attackers had the advantage and high grounds and mountains above and unleashing everything they h. >> the sergeant and others jumped from their bids and he managed to call in air support that killed 30 insurgent. rockit grenad explode cent chap nel in his hip and arm and neck. came within 10 feet. >> they charged and they kept 50 meters and 80s and 100 meter run through a hail of bullets . they reached their fallen frinds and they brought them hoim. >> staff sergeant clint romesha is a reb luctant hero. >> this awarted is for the eight soldiers that didn't make it and the rift of the team that fought valiently and magnif stently that day. >> their parents were at the white house for the medal of honor ceremony. his fellow soldiers would follow staff sergeant roimsha to hell
afghan united states operation targeting taliban fighters in the northeast part of the country. >> the united states and russia are coming together to try to find a resolution to the ongoing crisis in syria. secretary of state john kerry speaking today with russia's foreign minister on the phone about the best way to use their respective influence to end the bloodshed. and now live to jerusalem and this is an important move on of behalf of russia, and the united states? >>reporter: russia is syria's biggest backer and john kerry spoke to the russian foreign minister after trying to reach the russian foreign minister but nothing particularly concrete came out of this discussion only a promise to meet face to face in the future. the fighting is et cetera can -- is escalating in aleppo with opposition fighters stepping up attacks on airbases capturing two regime airports. assad troops have responded by shelling several rebel-held areas and the u.n. is trying to make another push to open up talks between opposition groups and the syrian government. both sides have refused to talk t
out secret effort to persuade the taliban to expel bin laden. as we know, bin laden was not expelled. three months later, his wrath was unleashed with an attack on our embassies. did you advise director tenant against this operation? and if so, why? >> i had a conversation with george and that at the time. every single cia manager, george tennant as deputy director of operations at the time, and other individuals at the counter-terrorism center argued against that operation as well because it was not well grounded in intelligence, and its chances of success were minimal. and it was likely that other individuals would be killed. when i was involved in those discussions, i provided the director and others my professional advice about whether i thought that operation should go forward. i also was engaged in discussion with the saudi government at the time. and i encouraged certain action to be taken to put pressure on the taliban as well as bin laden. >> i take it that your answer to my question is that you did advise in favor of the cancellation of that operation. >> based on what i ha
environment. she also obviously trains every day. >> right. she was something to be feared. i know the taliban sees these military working dogs as a precious target to them because they're keeping you safe. we watched a video of her ripping somebody to shreds. >> they're a valuable asset in every part over there. they play the ability for them to do what they do is just -- there is nothing that beats it. , a lot of people are putting their lives in their hands. >> leonard, six months ago, it's hard to believe this was just six months ago, early morning in july, take us back when she saved your life. >> technically she did. technically. she did two days prior, she had alerted behavior of an ied, which we called up the expert. that's one situation. she was on the right side of the road. stayed to the left side of the road. >> what happened to you? there was a crazy explosion. i think we've got video of that. we want to take a listen. >> staff sergeant len anderson and his working dog are on patrol near the taliban strong hold. >> got my scout. >> you feel like you would have died if it weren't f
to us and said they were going to renounce themselves from the taliban. and this is how i believe we win the war, for what it's worth. i believe that by lowering the supporters of the taliban and by that and stopping their freedom of movement, we win the war and stop terrorism. so that's what we were trying to do on this mission. but almost immediately upon entering the village, my team was under attack. it was an ambush, and it was big. it didn't take me long to realize that it wasn't a normal ambush. i've been in quite a few fire fights by this time, but it's like at the first of any fire fight it's kind of like the dust comes in, you try to figure out any situation, the dust comes in, you figure it out, and then your training kicks in, and you just start doing your job after about 10 or 15 minutes. but not in this fight. it was like one thing after another started to fail us. and everything started to fall like a house of cards. everything that we relied on in every other fire fight to support us wasn't happening. it was like our mission was falling quickly like a house of cards. and
stories making news. good news for the pakistani school girl who narrowly survived a taliban attack last fall. she is say nominee for the nobel peace prize. she was targeted for efforts to promote education. if you have a twitter account, now is a good time to change the password. hackers broke into 250,000 accounts snagging user names and e-mail addresses and passwords. twitter insist that is the site is secure. this weekend marks the 1 understand hundredth anniversary of the grand central terminal. the world's largest train station and also one of new york's popular tourist attracts. happy birthday, grand central. the super bowl takes center stage this weekend down in new orleans and living rooms across this country. last yore's big game was the most watched television event in u.s. history. for the city of new orleans, two big parties to be just what the doctor ordered. nbc's jay gray drew the short straw. le is hanging out in new orleans at the super bowl and then mardi gras back to back in the big easy. how will all the festivities be for the ongoing recovery? >> that's interesting
are told. >>> in the united kingdom doctors say the pakistani teen activist shot in the head by the taliban is doing well. some good news. this coming after five hours of surgery over the weekend. they say she won't need any more operations. this really is an extraordinary story. malala yousafzai became a symbol of courage after she was attacked for her crusade to educate pakistani girls. doctors say they are pleased with the progress malala is making and we will hear from her in a minute. first we will bring in our chief medical correspondent. sanjay, good to see you. you are of course a neurosurgeon, you have done these types of surgeries before. sometimes in the battlefield, as i recall. explain for us what was involved in replacing this piece of missing bone in her skull. the most extraordinary thing is you have this girl shot in the head, she was so eloquent and speaking so well. tell us how you did this. >> reporter: it's extraordinary on many levels. there are all types of injuries. and certainly neurosurgeons want to know exactly what happened to the brain. what exactly the type of
by the taliban because she wanted to go to school and spoke out on girls rights. she was just released from the hospital in the u.k. 15-year-old malala had reconstructive surgeries over the weekend. she is an international symbol for freedom. she is using her survival to push for women's education. she was nominated for the nobel peace prize this year as well as "time"'s person of the year. rick: drones, they're not welcome in seattle. the city's democratic mayor ordering the police department to abandon its use or planned use for them following protests from people there. and privacy advocates. seattle's police department had purchased two drones. they hadn't used them yet, pending approval from the faa well, speaking of drones, and privacy concerns, a law maker in texas wants to ban them from taking pictures of homes and other private property. but there is already a big effort to stop that measure. lance gooden is the state representative behind the bill. he joins us live this morning. good to see you. thank you very much for joining us, representative gooden. thanks for joining us this
and this kid is out there in the middle of nowhere with 400 taliban and in the middle east and he's tremendously courageous and tremendously brave and taking them on saving not only fellow soldiers, but ultimately saving database. ask about bravery and courage go on often every day in a war zone and i just think it's difficult to think that everybody who performs in that kind of fashion that somehow we have to establish, you know, a separate fund to try to assist them. the reality is that men and women in uniform put their lives on the line every day. it's a sacrifice for this country. and i think the great thing about this country is that there are those that are willing to do that and not worry about whether or not they're going to get an award for additional pay, but they just do it because they love this country. >> secretary, why did you, general dempsey and secretary clinton recommend that the u.s. provide weapons to the rebel forces in syria? were you disappointed the white house turned that down? and do you think is the result of that that this war could go on endlessly? >
in afghanistan by the taliban. we went shopping. ladies that the cosmetics counter in the department store came up and said thank you so much for speaking for women in afghanistan. that was the first time i thought, hey, they heard me. i knew what ladybird had set of course. host: laura bush in tehran words on the use of first lady -- in her own words. we have all the first ladies in their own words. you can go to the website and see what many people have said about the role of the first lady. that is all on our website, c- span.org \firstladies. this is one from martha washington. host: "steady as a clock, busy as a bee." host: jordan, democratic caller. caller: i love all the first lady's and have loved all the first ladies in all my years. are anothert lady's voice piece for any and every issue that we should be talking about in our country and around the world. they promote any type of legislation or any of the issues that we need to be talking about. they get to use that in one of the most public personas through the media. there is no way any of the presidents of the united states would h
the taliban spokesman on the line. ask how he feels about getting his [ bleep ] kicked. >> sanctuary cities, what do you think? >> i think you have the story almost exactly wrong, my friend. i think we're talking about drunk driving. i hi the hoodie is as much responsible for trayvon martin's death as george zimmerman was. it could be a jewish drunk, it could be a polish drunk, it could be an irish drunk, an italian drunk. what the hell difference does it make -- >> it makes plenty of difference. >> the state department, the cia, does nothing, sends no help. >> it's an absolute misrepresentation. you are a politician needing to make a political point. >> that's a cheap political point and you know it. >> this is justice. >> this has nothing to do with being mayor. >> he's going to fight for the people of new jersey is what we're saying. >> just like that. >> western civilization is in trouble. come on. come on. really. >> seriously. >> really. come on. >> what we didn't show you there was al capone's vault, 1986, a great day for the country. >> great television. great television. >> that wa
it was overran by the taliban. he's somebody who is very aware of things that did not go the way of the americans that way. he blames himself still for troops that were lost that day, even though there's nothing that he could have done to save them, they are still very, very tough on him receives when it comes to the eight men that were killed that day. >> he is a real, real hero and he will be honored. i want to alert our viewers, jake has a special tonight. jake tapper reports "an american hero" it airs at 10:00 p.m. eastern only here on cnn. >>> john brennans wasn't the only administration official taking heat up on capitol hill today. up next, the reason the outgoing defense secretary leon panetta is giving for why the u.s. military could not save lives in benghazi. get ready for a lot more of that new-plane smell. we're building the youngest, most modern fleet among the largest us airlines to ensure that you are more comfortable and connected than ever. we are becoming a new american. to find you a great deal, even if it's not with us. [ ding ] oh, that's helpful! well, our company does that
, wolf. the taliban are taking credit for an attack on a police outpost in the eastern part of the country. gunman broke in during the night and killed 17 people, shooting them as they slept. ten officers are among the dead. the rest are friends and relatives, who happen to be spending the night in what they thought was a safe place. >>> and now to some business news and a big day on wall street. the dow jones industrials closed at a five-year high and a little under 90 points short of their all-time high. this was the second day of a big rally, sparked by good news from the housing market and upbeat talk from federal reserve chairman, ben bernanke. >>> and the classical music world is mourning today the death of a pianist whose playing brought communist and capitalists together. vann clyburn, a texan, was only 23 years old when he won an international competition in moscow back in 1958 during the height of the cold war. he's considered one of the greatest pianists of the 20th century. he developed bone cancer and died today in texas. he was 78 years old. but had a lot of pe
stories to tell you about. the pakistani school girl shot in the head by the taliban is now recovering after her final surgery in england. doctors say she is in stable condition and is awake talking to staff and members of her family. the 15-year-old was attacked in october while standing up for equal education rights. >>> as the president gets ready to take his gun control plans on the road, the white house releasing this picture of him skeet shooting at camp david. the president looking to gain support for a ban on assault weapons. "fox news sunday" hosts chris wallace said it's another part of the president's proposal that has the best chance of passing. >>> some kind of expansion and possibly even a universal background check. you'd have to go through a background check to make sure that you didn't have a mental health history or a record o, a criminal record. >> the president will be in minneapolis tomorrow pushing his gun control policy. >>> and president obama making changes to his birth control mandate. now some religiously affiliated groups will be able to opt out. the white h
and defeated the taliban on our behalf not the mean he of our enemy, but these are radical islamic jihadists who want a cal fate -- caliphate in which the united states is sub jew dated to a religious -- subjugated to a religious ruler and they are willing to use violence if necessary, although the muslim brotherhood now seems to indicate that here in america they have made so much progress in infiltrating and getting positions of power in our government, our state department, in our homeland security department, in our justice department, at the white house directly, and direct lines to the president, they have made so much progress in moving toward that goal of a caliphate here in the united states under shari'a law, not under the constitution, that they are thinking maybe violence is not the way forward in america to achieve their goal of making this a shari'a compliant caliphate. but the muslim brotherhood around the world believes many places violence is the way forward in those areas. but we've got to understand who we are facing and what they want to do. and secretary clinton, unfortu
settlement with the taliban parts would that be useful? >> well, first of all i think the terrible bomb blast do underline what i think emphasized throughout the presentation is that terrorism remains one of the most serious threats we face, and this is one of the issues united states and india has worked on closely together. i'm not sure that it could be homegrown terrorism. we have had a number of tax which have been traced to inspiration outside the country i don't know yet. we will have to wait until the investigation reports are being completed. but counterterrorism certainly has attracted the attention of our government at the highest levels. we have developed a number of new mechanisms, both in terms of intelligence, in terms of the coordination between central government and the states because policing the estate subject. and, indeed, for instant checking and working out -- but like every other country, we are on the frontline of terrorism. we perhaps a little more than others, and we need to reinforce our efforts. and we will certainly be hoping to work very closely with our u.s. par
teenagers, generally want to stop at the time they're 30 and 20 taliban it's bad for them, you remind them of the fact that they couldn't control their own destiny so they get anxious, and what did they do? facebook. it's a coping mechanism. we get a large trial at colombia university sponsored by the nih. wanting as with which we can have depressed people in the trial. we had to cancel the trial but we couldn't find a single smoker who was not clinically depressed. the fundamental insight yet again is what to do to help these folks? i would argue that you take a couple different paths. one is show them what's happening. this is what a smoker's lung looks like. you can't hide from the. just look at the darn thing. at 11:00 you see that? as emphysema. the dark tar deposits is pretty evident as well from the cigarettes. and when you see that you have awareness and understanding why this matters to you. but the second insight you have, we offer is there certain times you can change people's minds. as a heart surgeon i don't have a lot of control of people who come in for surgery. i've done my
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